Koomurri Aboriginal Incursions

THINK INSIDE THE CIRCLE

National Sorry day
26th May every year
Koomurri's Russell Dawson
Russell Dawson opening the 2018 NAIDOC Awards

Photo Compliments Joseph Mayers

Aboriginal men and women dancers

Photo Compliments Joseph Mayers

Koomurri Women and Men 2018 NAIDOC Awards
Rayma Johnson of Koomurri
Because Of Her We Can
Rayma Johnson - Smokin'

Photo Compliments Joseph Mayers

Book Indigenous Cultural Experiences

Anytime
Any Place
For any occasion

Because Of Her We Can
Buuja Buuja (Butterfly Dancers)
Sydney Swans AFL Indigenous Round
Proudly Welcoming
2015 to 2018
Reconciliation Week 2018
Eureka 89 Skydeck Melbourne
Department of Communications and The Arts
Weltmuseum Wien Grand Reopening
Vienna Austria October 2017
Pre-School Joeys Packages
Public Performance

Barangaroo Sydney 2017

School Performance & Workshops

Australia Wide

Corporate and Special Events Entertainment
Corporate Team Building

Think Inside The Circle

Create Together

Traditional Ceremony
Australian and International Conference
Community Programs
International Schools
Cultural Education Programs
previous arrow
next arrow
Slider


What Is National Sorry Day About?

An important part of healing

National Sorry Day

National Sorry Day is an Australia-wide observance held on May 26 each year. This day gives people the chance to come together and share the steps towards healing for the Stolen Generations, their families and communities. Stolen generations refer to Indigenous Australians who were forcibly removed from their families and communities.

The first National Sorry Day was held on May 26, 1998, which was one year after the tabling of a report about the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families. The report, known as Bringing Them Home, acknowledged that Indigenous children were forcibly separated from their families and communities since the early days of European occupation in Australia. Governments and missionaries were responsible for this forced separation.

Systematic removal practices were implemented through various assimilation and “protection” policies by the late 19th century. Many Indigenous children were forcibly taken away from their families in the name of assimilation during the 1950s and 1960s. These children are known as the “Stolen Generations”. They were brought up in institutions or fostered to non-Indigenous families. This removal was official government policy in Australia until 1969.

By the 1980s, by welfare and community groups spoke out that governments' social welfare practices were discriminatory against Indigenous people. This forced a reappraisal of removal and placement practice during the 1980s. In 1980 the family tracing and reunion agency Link-Up (NSW) Aboriginal Corporation was established. Similar services now exist throughout Australia.

Australia’s Prime Minister Kevin Rudd tabled a motion in parliament on February 13, 2008, apologizing to Australia’s Indigenous people, particularly the Stolen Generations and their families and communities, for the laws and policies that inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss. The apology included a proposal for a policy commission to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in matters such as life expectancy, educational achievement, and economic opportunity. This event is seen by many as a step forward in reconciliation.


What Can You Do

Because Of her We can

A growing number of National Sorry Day activities and events take place throughout Australia on National Sorry Day. You can join in in many ways that are already organised or by organising your own event such as

  • Hold concerts and aboriginal performance and ceremony
  • Hold a barbecue, morning teas or lunch. Maybe try some kangaroo on the barbie.
  • Join a Reconciliation walk or street march.
  • Attend a Sorry Day flag raising events.
  • Attend or organise a speech from community leaders an Indigenous Australian elders or an aboriginal educator such as Koomurri
  • Check out the media statements from politicians within federal, state and local governments and start a conversation.
  • Write messages and sign the various “sorry books” as a way of showing your commitment towards reconciliation. Contact your local areas Aboriginal Land Council to find out where these might be or ask if you could help start one.
  • Pledge your support towards fulfilling the recommendations from the 'Bringing Them Home report'. Thousands of Australians have already shown their support by writing messages and signing “sorry books” since 1998.

Many school children take part in National Sorry Day activities, which include essay competitions, lighting candles for Indigenous Australians who were taken away from their families and communities, and inviting local Indigenous Australian elders to speak with students. Films that focus on the Stolen Generations may also be shown to students for discussion.

Your school, business or organisation can book a vast variety of aboriginal performance, welcome, smoking ceremony or art workshop though Koomurri.


Download Ceremony and Performance Packages Below

Koomurri Joeys Packages

Click Here to download Pre-School Joeys Brochure

Our pre school packages are fun filled entertainment for the little tackers with plenty of hands on fun, song and dance.

School and College Workshops

Click Here to download Koomurri Schools and College Brochure

Our School incursions and workshops are renowned Australia wide and are customised to suit each age groups through to HSC students, Tafe, colleges and universities.

Team Building and Performance

Click here to download Corporate and Business Performance & Workshops

Our adult programs are a hit across all styles of business, NGO's and government bodies and can be performed in-house or in outdoor areas and function centres. We also perform concert and ceremony for large events and stadiums.

Aboriginal Survivor and Cultire Program

Click Here to download Aboriginal 1 & 2 day Team Building Programs

This program can be customised to suit school camps and programs, corporate, medium and small business, tourism and travel agents cultural tours, sporting teams and special needs organisations looking for an authentic educational and fun experience.


"The Dance Trope provided an outstanding Traditional Welcome to our foreign and local guests. The performance presented an educational and entertaining view into Australia’s rich cultural heritage. Thank you for contributing a special start to our conference.”

Previous Executive Director - Passports Office

Dr Jamal Rifi

"I have known Russell and Connie Dawson from the Koomurri Aboriginal dance group for a long time. I have used their professional services in community events and I have found them to be punctual, courteous and take their profession and Aboriginal dance and culture very seriously. "

Dr. Jamal Rifi

"We are most grateful to the dancers for their most professional performance of a very moving dance sequence which provided a special dimension to the ceremony. We would have no hesitation in recommending the Koomurri Dance Troupe to anyone thinking of engaging their services.”

Stephanie Munday-Lake
Assistant Director - Anglican School Office

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider
Play
Play
Play
Play
Play
previous arrow
next arrow
Slider